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June 21, 2005

Table of Contents

Cool Links: The Literary Encyclopedia
Free Resources: The Newberry Library’s Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms
ITI Cross Links: Readex Announces Digital Edition of American Broadsides and Ephemera
Cool Links: Gaming for Librarians—An Introduction
ISTE Publishes ‘Integrated Technologies, Innovative Learning: Insights from the PT3 Program'
Vantage Learning’s I-Manage 2.0 Offers Expanded Services for IntelliMetric Automated Essay Scoring
From the Library of Congress—Parallel Histories: Spain, the United States, and the American Frontier
Scholastic Library Publishing Unveils Enhanced Grolier Online
Art Museum Image Gallery Debuts on H.W. Wilson’s WilsonWeb

Cool Links: The Literary Encyclopedia

How's this for welcoming, inviting text on the home page of a reference work?

One never reaches home. But whenever friendly paths intersect, the whole world looks like home for a time.

Herman Hesse, Demian
 
Reading The Literary Encyclopedia is free. Just click on "Search" above, or consult our Guide for advice on searching.

That's what you're greeted with when you visit The Literary Encyclopedia, a site whose aim:

… is to provide profiles of the lives and works of literary authors whose works are valued in the English language, and other prominent figures such as philosophers and musicians whose lives and works are of interest to the literary reader. The Literary Encyclopedia presents its information within electronic databases which will enable readers to explore literary history as never before, and will supplement these with notes on major historical events in order to extend understanding of the social and cultural contexts of literary production.

Further:

The Literary Encyclopedia is written and owned by a global network of scholars and researchers (above 1,000 and rising steadily) who are committed to making the publication into one of the most rewarding sites on the internet. The publication was first published in October 2000. All our entries have been written since 1999 and most since 2001 so they are very much ‘state of the art' and quite unlike nearly everything else you'll find on the internet (we have no old printed goods served up in new dress). All are written by specialists who really know and indeed love their material so there are no entries written by scriveners (again unlike most printed reference works).

We explored The Literacy Encyclopedia a bit after hearing about it via a posting on LM-NET (have you subscribed yet?), and we think it's a Cool Link. Click HERE to go there.

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Free Resources: The Newberry Library’s Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms

We faithfully scan librarian Marylaine Block's "Neat New Stuff I Found This Week" e-mail newsletter (see her Web site at http://marylaine.com/neatnew.html) for gems that the K-12 sector might like and use, and we recommend her site and newsletter to you. She tipped her readers off to this Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms resource recently.

From the Newberry Library's Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms Web site:

"Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms" has been prepared by the staff of the Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography at the Newberry Library. We hope that this site will help teachers at all grade levels make effective use of historic map documents in their classrooms to help students with their map reading skills and to foster a greater appreciation of the geographical dimensions of American history. The site has been designed specifically to support basic map and information acquisition skills at the K-2 levels and social studies, history, or geography teaching at other levels. We hope, however, that it will prove useful to teachers of other subjects, such as science and art.

Here's a sampling of available historic maps, each accompanied by lesson plans for K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12:

* The World Columbus Knew in 1482
* Fremont Surveys the Road from Missouri to Oregon, 1843
* Migration, Indian Removal and The Oklahoma Land Rush, 1890
* The Distribution of Woodland in the United States, 1873

There are lots more. And there's also an index "to indicate which lesson plans are appropriate for teaching the National Education Standards adopted by the National Council for the Social Studies and the National Council for Geographic Education."

Click HERE to link to the Historic Maps in K-12 Classrooms site.

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ITI Cross Links: Readex Announces Digital Edition of American Broadsides and Ephemera

For you primary source afficionados, NewsBank, Inc.'s Readex has announceed that the digital edition of American Broadsides and Ephemera will be abailable in Fall 2005, including 15,000 broadsides printed between 1820 and 1876.

The full story has been posted on this week's Information Today, Inc. NewsBreaks site.

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Cool Links: Gaming for Librarians—An Introduction

We've been following in background mode the subject of "gaming"—no, not gambling, but more like online collaborative and/or role-playing games—and what it may mean for current and upcoming generations of learners and researchers, and we recommend that you keep an eye on the field as well.

That's why a reference on Gary Price's ResourceShelf recently caught our eye. He points his subscribers to an article entitled Gaming for Librarians—An Introduction, by Heather Wilson, a secondary-school-level instructional librarian. In it, she touches on her rationale for promoting gaming: "Recently I … heard people lament the fact that teens are playing video games and not reading. They are missing the point. Gaming often requires reading, problem-solving, and critical thinking. Through gaming, teens are learning in a way that is unfamiliar to most librarians."

The article is worth the read. Two sections, Why Have Games in the Library? and Bringing Games into the Library, cut to the chase, and the resources section is very useful.

Note that Heather Wilson has a Web site, http://www.thecollectiblelibrarian.com, that "addresses librarians with information on gaming for teens in libraries and reviews of specific role-playing game titles," but we were unable to access her site on the day we posted this Cool Link.

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ISTE Publishes ‘Integrated Technologies, Innovative Learning: Insights from the PT3 Program'

The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) has announced the publication of a new book, "Integrated Technologies, Innovative Learning: Insights from the PT3 Program," which offers ideas, approaches, and best practices for training teachers for the future they and their students will face. Edited by Mark Bailey and Steve Rhine, the book is a collection of essays on exemplary Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to Use Technology (PT3) projects written by a diverse range of project managers.

Between 1999 and 2004, the PT3 program and its more than 400 projects explored new ways to harness the potential of technology to transform learning and teacher education, according to the ISTE announcement.

With 20 chapters highlighting projects from across the nation, the new book provides stories of transformation at the institutional and individual levels. "Integrated Technologies, Innovative Learning" discusses different models for mentoring and field experience, the big gains possible with partnerships, and the key role of electronic portfolios in evaluating performance and promoting reflective practice.

The book is intended for teacher educators, college of education faculty and administrators, professional development personnel, education researchers, and preservice teachers.

"Integrated Technologies, Innovative Learning" may be purchased online for $35.95 for ISTE members and $39.95 for nonmembers. More information about the book, including the table of contents and a free downloadable excerpt, is available at http://www.iste.org/store.

Source: International Society for Technology in Education, http://www.iste.org

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Vantage Learning’s I-Manage 2.0 Offers Expanded Services for IntelliMetric Automated Essay Scoring

Vantage Learning has announced the release of version 2.0 of I-Manage, a Web-based management tool that allows customers using the IntelliMetric Web-services-based API to integrate automated essay scoring with their writing assessment and instructional applications. Version 2.0 offers significantly greater functionality, with expanded Web services and line-by-line feedback, according to the Vantage Learning announcement.

With I-Manage, customers can score essay responses; provide line-by-line feedback on spelling, grammar and mechanics; identify parts of speech for each word or phrase; and identify the readability level of the student's essay. I-Manage 2.0 also includes VIOLERT, which is capable of evaluating a writer's intent to do harm to oneself or others, and CLEANSPEAK, to identify potentially inappropriate words included within the essay.

Customers can use I-Manage to add new writing prompts and rubrics, as well as allow users to edit both. The tools include several quality control and testing features, intended to facilitate implementation. Customers can monitor usage and obtain reports with an interface that allows selection by date range, prompt, and other criteria.

The IntelliMetric essay scoring engine uses a blend of artificial intelligence (AI) and the digitization of human expertise to score and assess examinee responses to open-ended essay questions in a range of subjects. The results of over 120 studies conducted in range of K-12 and higher education environments found that IntelliMetric scores as accurately as human expert scorers, according to the announcement. [Editor's Note: For an independently written discussion of the IntelliMetric prompt-based essay scoring engine, see Charles Doe's article AI vs. the Pen: Cutting-Edge Tools for Teaching Writing, in the May/June 2005 issue of MultiMedia & Internet@Schools.]

Source: Vantage Learning, http://www.vantagelearning.com

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From the Library of Congress—Parallel Histories: Spain, the United States, and the American Frontier

The Library of Congress has redesigned and expanded its bilingual, multi-format English-Spanish digital library site devoted to Spanish exploration and settlement in North America from the 15th to the early 19th centuries. This cooperative effort between the National Library of Spain and the Library of Congress has added materials from the collections of the National Library. The project is part of the Library of Congress Global Gateway initiative to build digital library partnerships with national libraries around the world. The site may be accessed at http://international.loc.gov/intldl/eshtml/.

Parallel Histories: Spain, the United States, and the American Frontier explores the history of the Spanish presence in the territories now part of the U.S., from the first voyage of Columbus in 1492 to the exploration and settlement of California and the American Southwest in the early 19th century. It is intended for use by schools and libraries and by the general public worldwide. Its objective is to present important primary-source materials online—maps, manuscripts, rare books, prints, photographs, and other materials relating to the history of Spain and Spain's role in the exploration, settlement, and development of North America.

Parallel Histories: Spain, the United States, and the American Frontier includes some 55,000 images from the rare book, manuscript, map, and print collections of the Library of Congress and the National Library of Spain. Among the items available on the site are Columbus' letter of 1493 describing his first voyage to the New World; Naufragios [Shipwrecked], the account of the eight-year trek in the 1520s and 1530s by Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca from Florida to Mexico; Villagra's Historia de Nueva Mexico, the first Spanish history of New Mexico; and manuscript items from the Hans P. Kraus Collection of Hispanic American Manuscripts relating to Arredondo, Las Casas, Verrazano, Vespucci, and others. The site also includes rare maps showing the voyages and discoveries of De Soto, Coronado, Father Eusebio Kino, Father Junipero Serra, and other prominent Spaniards.

The Library of Congress's Global Gateway Web site of international collections and links to international Web sites is available at http://international.loc.gov/. "Parallel Histories: Spain, the United States, and the American Frontier" may be found under the link to "Collaborative Digital Libraries." For inquiries regarding this collection, visit the Global Gateway inquiry form at http://www.loc.gov/help/contact-international.html

Source: The Library of Congress, http://loc.gov

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Scholastic Library Publishing Unveils Enhanced Grolier Online

Scholastic Library Publishing has announced the debut of the new and enhanced Grolier Online for schools, public libraries, and homes. Available on site and at home to anyone who uses Grolier Online from a subscribing school or library, Grolier Online delivers educational content within a controlled research environment that's safe, fun and easy to use, according to the Scholastic Library Publishing announcement.

The new Grolier Online features two new, dynamic home pages with age-appropriate content—Grolier Online Kids, for grades 3-5, and Grolier Online Passport, for grades 5 to adult—which are designed to facilitate research efforts for students at varying grade levels. Grolier Online Kids' design includes easier navigation for younger students and age-appropriate current events from The New Book of Knowledge "NewScoops." Grolier Online Passport provides a more sophisticated learning environment with in-depth current events from worldwide news sources and wire services such as the Associated Press, in addition to debate topics from Grolier's Pro/Con print series. Grolier Online also supports varying learning styles by presenting information in both text-only and multimedia formats.

A more Web-like search environment allows users to simultaneously access and search all licensed encyclopedia databases, Web links, magazines, media, and news features with a single click. A more robust search engine enables users to refine their searches, and provides general search help like "Did you mean?" and "More like this?"

The new Grolier Online goes live in June at http://go.grolier.com. All current subscribers will automatically have access to this new and enhanced learning environment. A free trial is available for all unsubscribed educators.

Source: Scholastic Library Publishing, http://www.scholasticlibrary.com

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Art Museum Image Gallery Debuts on H.W. Wilson’s WilsonWeb

H.W. Wilson has announced it will offer the Art Museum Image Gallery, a new art image database to replace The AMICO Library that ceases publication in July. Art Museum Image Gallery is a rich digital resource of art images and related multimedia gathered from the collections of distinguished museums around the world, reflecting the wide coverage offered by The AMICO Library, according to the H.W. Wilson announcement. All images are rights-cleared for educational use, so that students can download them for papers, and teachers can include them in class lectures. The new database can be searched seamlessly with other popular Wilson art resources such as Art Full Text and Art Index Retrospective, to retrieve both images and articles.

Art Museum Image Gallery features over 94,000 high-quality, high-resolution images, spanning artistic creation from 3,000 B.C. to the present, virtually mirroring the content researchers enjoyed with The AMICO Library. A description accompanies each entry, as well as curatorial text, provenance data, detail or multiple views, and for many works, related multimedia. The WilsonWeb interface allows searching by a range of parameters beyond title of work and artist, including subject, materials and techniques, artist nationality and birthplace, owner of work, and date created, among others.

The new image database includes both fine and decorative art: painting, sculpture, drawings, prints, photographs, textiles, costumes, jewelry, ceramics, furniture, glass, books and manuscripts, archaeological finds, and beyond. Wide-ranging coverage encompasses art from the cultures of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (including Native American and MesoAmerican peoples).

Free 30-day trial subscriptions will be available for librarians when the database is released on July 1, 2005. H.W. Wilson will preview the database at ALA 2005 (June 25-28, Chicago). For more information about Art Museum Image Gallery, visit http://www.hwwilson.com/databases/artmuseum.htm.

Source: H.W. Wilson, http://www.hwwilson.com

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