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Creating a Broadcasting Empire … From the Corner of Your Classroom!

By Dan Schmit - Posted Jan 1, 2007
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For years, the Internet-connected computer has been a conduit that supports the academic and creative work of teachers and students alike. We've enjoyed an ever-widening landscape of information portals and resources that bring the world to the fingertips and minds of our students. As computing power increases and the Internet continues its evolution, new generations of opportunities are making their way into the spotlight. Advancements in media production and syndicated distribution have sparked revolutionary changes and opportunities available to millions of Internet users. Podcasting is emerging as one of those technological diamonds in the rough that has the potential to reshape the way we look at the Internet, mass media, and ourselves.

The Internet is Flat

Consider the media landscape in the U.S. over the past 50 years. The vast majority of radio and television programs have been produced by a relatively small number of companies and organizations. These ivory towers of mass media continue to play an important role in shaping the direction and tone of political discourse, popular culture, and academia. The "mass" in mass media has traditionally referred to the masses of media consumers. The immense resources required to produce a radio or television show have made it impractical for individuals, such as teachers or students, to create and distribute their own shows. Media companies have been in the driver's seat with few incentives for sharing it. The limited range of frequencies and prime-time slots also work against producing shows that appeal to small niche groups. However, the explosion in personal computing and the distributed power of the Internet have altered the media landscape of the 21st century, creating a more international, more level, and more diverse playing field.

Consider the media landscape in the U.S. over the past 50 years. The vast majority of radio and television programs have been produced by a relatively small number of companies and organizations. These ivory towers of mass media continue to play an important role in shaping the direction and tone of political discourse, popular culture, and academia. The "mass" in mass media has traditionally referred to the masses of media consumers. The immense resources required to produce a radio or television show have made it impractical for individuals, such as teachers or students, to create and distribute their own shows. Media companies have been in the driver's seat with few incentives for sharing it. The limited range of frequencies and prime-time slots also work against producing shows that appeal to small niche groups. However, the explosion in personal computing and the distributed power of the Internet have altered the media landscape of the 21st century, creating a more international, more level, and more diverse playing field.

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This article is available in its entirety in a variety of formats — Preview, Full Text, Text+Graphics, and Page Image PDF — on a pay-per-view basis, courtesy of ITI's InfoCentral. CLICK HERE.


 
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