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Project Tomorrow’s Speak Up 2011 Survey Open through December 23rd

Posted Oct 13, 2011
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Project Tomorrow's Speak Up 2011 survey is open now until December 23rd. "Are schools ready for online-only assessments mandated by 2014? Do parents think online tests are valid? How do students prefer to learn math? How are schools funding their technology? What do students think is the difference between reading in print vs. digital formats?" These are just some of the questions being asked during the national survey.


Now in its 8th year, the Speak Up online survey will be completed by more than 300,000 K-12 students, educators and parents around the country. The annual survey about education and technology is facilitated through public, private and charter schools all around the country; every school is eligible to participate. The results provide important insights about education, technology and student aspirations to individual schools, state departments of education and national leaders.

The 2011 online surveys - open to all K-12 students, parents, teachers, librarians and administrators at www.tomorrow.org/speakup/- offers the largest collection of authentic, unfiltered input on education and technology from those "on the ground" in the schools, the announcement states.

More than 23,000 schools from all 50 states and the District of Columbia pre-registered to participate this year. This year's survey polls key stakeholder groups (including students) about many of the key education topics being discussed from the halls of Congress to school district board meetings, including:  

--With tight budgets, how are school and districts funding technology today?

--Will school districts be ready for the online-only assessments coming in 2014?  How do parents feel about these new online assessments?

--How do students prefer to learn math?  How do they want to learn about STEM careers? 

--Should schools allow students to use their own smartphones in class? 

--Can digital learning really personalize instruction? 

--How are digital content and e-textbooks being used by students and teachers?

--Is there a place for Facebook and other social media in schools?  

--How can technology support arts education?

Project Tomorrow will share the national data findings from the survey in the spring with federal, state and local policymakers.  Additionally, every school or district that participates in Speak Up receives a free online report with all of their locally collected data - and the national data findings to use for benchmark comparison.

Individual participation and responses provided in the Speak Up survey are completely confidential and completing the online survey takes only 20 minutes.  Schools and district must register to participate in Speak Up.  Speak Up is open to every public and private school and district in the United States, American schools on military bases and other interested schools worldwide.

Since 2003, more than 2.2 million K-12 students, educators and parents from more than 30,000 schools in all 50 states have participated in Speak Up. The online survey is facilitated by Project Tomorrow and supported by many of our nation's most innovative companies, foundations and nonprofit organizations including Blackboard, Inc., DreamBox, Hewlett-Packard, K12, Inc., Qualcomm's Wireless Reach Initiative, Schoolwires and SMART Technologies.

Project Tomorrow partners with more than 75 different education associations, organizations and think-tanks for outreach to the schools and development of the survey questions including the American Association of School Administrators, Consortium for School Networking, iNACOL, International Society for Technology in Education, National School Boards Association, National Science Digital Library, National Secondary School Principals Association, Southern Regional Education Board and State Education Technology Directors' Association.

Source: Project Tomorrow, www.tomorrow.org

 


 
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