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Learning.com Brings Digital Literacy to High School Students with Project NextTech

Posted Nov 4, 2014
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Learning.com has announced Project NextTech, a high school digital literacy course that helps prepare students for success in high school, college, and their future career opportunities. The content is based on curriculum developed by the nonprofit Generation YES through years of research and student and teacher feedback. Project NextTech addresses the 24 performance indicators in the ISTE Standards for Students and provides authentic learning experiences along with opportunities for students to demonstrate their skills through projects and a final portfolio.

Project NextTech’s curriculum is organized around three core topics:

  • Technology Literacy: students develop technology skills and the ability to select the right tool for the context and audience.

  • Information Literacy: students locate and access information, evaluate information critically and competently, and use information effectively and ethically.

  • Media Literacy: students access, analyze, evaluate, and create media in all its forms.

Spanning two semesters, Project NextTech is divided into four nine-week curriculum blocks consisting of eight weeks of instruction and a one-week project. Each unit includes a teacher preparation section, student overview and performance-based activities to help educators evaluate student understanding. As a course capstone, students create a digital portfolio to showcase their projects and other examples of their best work.

Students can use their portfolios to demonstrate capabilities when applying to colleges or employment opportunities that require digital skills. The course also helps students identify strengths and interests while researching potential career choices.

Project NextTech will be available for schools to implement starting January 2015.

Source: Learning.com, learning.com


 
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