Blank gif
Section1
An Educator's Guide to Technology and the Web
Search Internet@Schools
Subscribe Today!

View Current Issue
View Past Issues

Internet @ Schools

Cram

By Charles G. Doe - Posted Mar 1, 2014
Bookmark and Share

Company: Cram.com, 8939 1/2 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood, CA 90069; website: cram.com. The company can also be accessed on Twitter (@flashcards) and Facebook (facebook.com/CramMode).

Price: Cram is free.

Audience: The audience is anyone old enough to use the required devices to create or benefit from studying flashcards.

Format: Cram is a web-based application or an app for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch; Android phone; or tablet. It can also be used via any computer with internet access.

System Requirements: Use with an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch requires iOS 6.1 or later. Or an Android device is required or a newer Windows computer with internet access.

 

REPORT CARD
Overall Rating:5 Stars
Installation:A
Content/Features:A
Ease of Use:A
Product Support:A

 

Description: Flashcards are one of the faster and better ways to memorize most kinds of information. Cram utilizes the Leitner system of studying and can be used to create and store flashcards for later use or to borrow flashcards created by others. Flashcards can be created and studied on whichever electronic device is used to access the website or run the app.

Reviewer Comments

Installation: Installation involves ensuring equipment is correct and setting up a free account at Cram.com or downloading the proper app to your electronic device. Installation: A

Content/Features: Flashcards have been in use since the 19th century and are an especially effective way to use the web and mobile applications to memorize certain kinds of information. Cram.com can automatically hide cards users already know and can turn any flashcard set into a memorization game to facilitate learning.

Flashcards can be turned into multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blank, and matching-questions formats. Study can be done anywhere using computers or mobile apps using flashcards you’ve created or borrowed from Cram’s huge library of flashcards created by others.

Cram.com has developed a modified version of the Leitner system, a method of using flashcards, called “Cram mode.” When studying flashcards in a given level, you go through the set normally and choose if it’s right or wrong. When all of the flashcards have been answered, you are presented with a summary of the results.

When the results are saved, all flashcards that were answered correctly are promoted to the next level. Flashcards that were incorrect are demoted to the first level. A set is complete when all flashcards are in the highest level. This way, users are automatically pushed toward focusing on the more difficult flashcards that are giving them the most problems.

Cram.com has flashcards available for many subjects, at many levels, in multiple languages. They can be used for assessment as well as study. As of January, Cram.com has 1,092,646 members with almost 75 million sets of flashcards.

Users can also create and save their own flashcards easily for more personalized applications. With preparing for a standardized or other test, memorizing information or reviewing information learned, Cram is an excellent, useful resource. Content/Features Rating: A

Ease of Use: Whether in study or flashcard creation mode, Cram is easy to use and has clear instructions. Ease of Use Rating: A

Product Support: Support is sufficient with limited online help and an online email form. Cram is easy enough to use with clear instructions that minimal support is needed. Product Support Rating: A

Recommendation: Cram is an excellent means of memorizing information and reviewing memorized information for test and other situations. I highly recommend it for third grade through college students and maybe even for younger ones. Highly Recommended

Reviewer: Charles Doe (charliegd@sbcglobal.net) is a 39-year teacher, including 10 years as elementary media specialist in Hastings Area Schools in Hastings, Mich. For the past 15 years, he has written articles and reviews for Internet@Schools.


 
Blank gif